CFSSL FTW

After reading how CloudFlare handles their PKI and that LetsEncrypt will use it I wanted to give CFSSL a shot.

Reading the project’s documentation doesn’t really help in building your own CA, but searching the Internet I found Fernando Barillas’ blog explaining how to create your own root certificate and how to create intermediate certificates from this.

I took it a step further I wrote a script generating new certificates for several services with different intermediates and possibly different configurations (e.g. depending on your distro and services certain cyphers (e.g. using ECC) may not be supported).
I also streamlined generating service specific key, cert and chain files. 😀

Have a look at the full Gist or just the most interesting part:

You’ll still have to deploy them yourself.

Update 2016-10-04:
Fixed some issues with this Gist.

  • Fixed a bug where intermediate CA certificates weren’t marked as CAs any more
  • Updated the example CSRs and the script so it can now be run without errors

Update 2017-10-08:

  • Cleaned up renew-certs.sh by extracting functions for generating root CA, intermediate CA and service keys.

Android Backup and Restore with ADB

Updating my OnePlus One recently to Cyanogen OS 12 I had to reset my phone a few times before everything ran smoothly … so I wrote a pair of scripts to help me copy things around.

It uses the Android SDK’s ADB tool to do the copying since the Android File Transfer Tool for Mac has a laughable quality for Google’s standards.

Synchronize directories between computers using rsync (and SSH)

https://twitter.com/climagic/status/363326283922419712

I found this command line magic gem some time ago and was using it ever since.

I started using it for synchronizing directories between computers on the same network. But it felt kind of clunky and cumbersome to get the slashes right so that it wouldn’t nest those directories and copy everything. Since both source and destination machine had the same basic directory layout, I thought ‘why not make it easier?’ … e.g. like this:

It uses rsync for the heavy lifting but does the tedious source and destination mangling for you. 😀

You can find the code in this Gist.

MagicDict

If you write software in Python you come to a point where you are testing a piece of code that expects a more or less elaborate dictionary as an argument to a function. As a good software developer we want that code properly tested but we want to use minimal fixtures to accomplish that.

So, I was looking for something that behaves like a dictionary, that you can give explicit return values for specific keys and that will give you some sort of a “default” return value when you try to access an “unknown” item (I don’t care what as long as there is no Exception raised (e.g. KeyError )).

My first thought was “why not use MagicMock?” … it’s a useful tool in so many situations.

But using MagicMock where dict is expected yields unexpected results.

First of all attribute and item access are treated differently. You setup MagicMock using key word arguments (i.e. “dict syntax”), but have to use attributes (i.e. “object syntax”) to access them.

Then I thought to yourself “why not mess with the magic methods?” __getitem__  and  __getattr__  expect the same arguments anyway. So this should work:

Well? …

… No!

By this time I thought “I can’t be the first to need this” and started searching in the docs and sure enough they provide an example for this case.

Does it work? …

Well, yes and no. It works as long as you only access those items that you have defined to be in the dictionary. If you try to access any “unknown” item you get a KeyError .

After trying out different things the simplest answer to accomplish what I set out to do seems to be sub-classing defaultdict.

And? …

Indeed, it is. 😀

Well, not quite. There are still a few comfort features missing (e.g. a proper __repr__ ). The whole, improved and tested code can be found in this Gist:

Unsafe Chrome Sometimes Necessary

In my work – every now and then – I found myself in need of a browser with reduced security checks (mainly to gloss over cross domain XMLHttpRequests and SSL certificate violations) for testing purposes. I didn’t want to take the risk and use my main browser session with these settings, so I made me a script (also available as a Gist). 🙂

Tip:
If you use oh my ZSH you can save this file in ~/.oh-my-zsh/custom/plugins/chrome-unsafe/chrome-unsafe.plugin.zsh and add “chrome-unsafe” to your list of used plugins in ~/.zshrc 

Convert any file VLC can play to mp3

I just felt the need for a script that could extract the audio track of a video, transcode it and save it as an mp3 file … 2 hours later I was finished (get the Gist). 😀 It uses VLC to do hard work. 😉

Thanks to Kris Hom for the inspiration. 🙂

Update 2014-03-01:

  • Check whether VLC is installed
  • Should also work on Linux now
  • Increase default bit rate to 192kbit/s
  • Fixed bug where the file/playlist would repeat endlessly

Update 2014-11-05:

  • Also look for VLC in “~/Application/”

Update 2016-03-05

Render Rails assets to string

If you ever needed a way to render a Rails assets to a string, Hongli Lai from Phusion describes how. 🙂

I prepared a Gist wrapping it into a nice helper. 😀